More Graduates, Fewer Criminals? The Economic Impacts of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (v2)

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Will Flanders, Ph.D.*

Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty

flanders@will-law.org

Corey A. DeAngelis, Ph.D.

Cato Institute

Corey.DeAngelis@gmail.com

ORCID: 0000-0003-4431-9489

December 11, 2018

*Corresponding author is Will Flanders, flanders@will-law.org. The content of the report is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the views of the Cato Institute or the Wisconsin Institute for Law & Liberty.

Abstract

Although an abundance of research indicates that private schooling can benefit individual children through higher test scores, the effects on society are less clear. We monetize and forecast the social impacts of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP) in the United States. We use existing literature on the impacts of the MPCP on criminal activity and graduation rates. Between 2016 and 2035, students who use a voucher in the MPCP are likely to generate additional economic benefits of $473 million associated with higher graduation rates, and $26 million associated with fewer felonies and misdemeanors, relative to their traditional public school peers.

Keywords: school choice; school vouchers; economic impact; civic education

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Maranto Admin Accountability for 2018 SSRJ

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Does Administrative Accountability Capture Student Learning?  An Arkansas Test

Robert Maranto (rmaranto@uark.edu), University of Arkansas

Kaitlin Anderson (ande2018@msu.edu), Michigan State University

Alexandra Boyd (boydalexandra@gmail.com), University of Arkansas 

Every restraint and requirement originated in somebody’s demand for it.

Herb Kaufman (1977, 29)

Abstract

Market critics propose that administrative accountability is superior to school choice in promoting school quality. We use Arkansas school level value added measures of student learning to test whether schools which are less effective academically are more likely to face administrative sanctions. We find very modest, but statistically significant relationships between school academic performance and state sanctions: fully accredited (non-sanctioned) schools are slightly more effective academically. We hypothesize that charter schools are more likely to face sanctions since they have fewer administrative resources; this is not supported by the data.

We discuss the relevant policy implications.

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